Success? You call this success? - Page 4 - WeightWatchers - Forums and Community

Jump to content


About MPA

MPA is a site dedicated to the support or recovery of those suffering from eating disorders or body dysmorphic disorders. Please be sensitive to this fact when creating an account and contributing to the board.


Success? You call this success?


  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#61 arlovesanimals

arlovesanimals

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:26 AM

I didn'like the group or lecture at all, got nothing out of it. It was very clicky, no helpful tips, just one or two people talking about their lives.

#62 Guest_Freckle Royalty_*

Guest_Freckle Royalty_*
  • Guests

Posted 03 October 2016 - 10:12 AM

I find all the commercial type diets allow far too many calories for me to successfully lose weight, even at the "sensible" levels of one to two pounds a week. I do use them as a basis, for example slimfast, and just drink maybe three or four shakes a day simply because it saves counting the calories .

 

Holy shit this is an old thread, but I wanted to comment on this since i experience the same thing with commercial diets. LOL Are you even still on mpa? 



#63 DebbiePT

DebbiePT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationMaryland

Posted 11 August 2018 - 09:50 PM

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote' data-author="FearlessKatie" data-cid="1302834" data-time="1389566924" data-date="12 January 2014 - 11:48 PM">FearlessKatie" data-cid="1302834" data-time="1389566924" data-date="12 January 2014 - 11:48 PM said:FearlessKatie" data-cid="1302834" data-time="1389566924" data-date="12 January 2014 - 11:48 PM said:<p>As some of you know, I started losing weight by following Weight Watchers Points Plus. It didn't take me very long to figure out that my weight loss would stall if I used all the "point" that were permitted for me (about 2000 calories). So I quit using weekly "indulgence" points and exercise-based "activity" points, though I still continued to exercise. Then I chose to use the minimum points acceptable to the Weight Watchers organization (about 1000 calories, not counting fruit and vegetables), and to make a long story short, I settled upon a 900-ish calorie daily intake as best for longterm weight loss AND live-ability. My goal was to adjust the Weight Watchers plan so that I could stay on it forever without being tempted to binge, and strangely enough, the more precisely I designed my pseudo-WW plan, the easier it became to follow it. "Indulging" myself with sugar and flour, even within my daily calorie allowance, was instantly trigger-y for me, as were fried foods, processed foods, regular dairy or meats (I need skim milk, lowfat cheese, 96% or leaner meat), crunchy snacks, etc. I need to pre-plan my meals, fast between an early dinner and a late breakfast, focus on lean protein and fresh fruit/veg, exercise 10 hours per week, and so on. So in the end, my diet doesn't look much like Weight Watchers anymore. My husband still wants me to attend the meetings, so I go to the meeting room, get weighed in, then hang out in the Humane Society cat adoption room at Petco. Because it's hard for me to keep my mouth shut when asked how I've lost 53 pounds since April, though I've been reprimanded from one side of WW to the other (in person and online) for telling the truth. Recent Weight Watchers ads have been touting a double-blind scientific study which shows that Weight Watchers members lose twice as much as other dieters. I wondered how this was possible, since I wasn't seeing many successful people at meetings (okay, I wasn't seeing ANY, except for hobby dieters who wanted to lose 5 pounds), and the calorie numbers weren't adding up. Remember that at 246 pounds, I was given points that were the equivalent of 2000 calories, and could earn more by not-really-exercise "activities" like standing up during TV commercials. So I just read the study report, and wouldn't you know it! Here's the truth beneath that "lose twice as much weight" headline: [For everyone who joined Weight Watchers, whether they stuck with it or not...], "the average weight loss at 12 months was 11.2 pounds (5.1 kilograms) for those using Weight Watchers versus 4.8 pounds (2.2 kg) for those on standard care. For those who completed the full 12 months, average weight loss was 14.4 pounds (6.7 kg) on Weight Watchers versus 7.2 pounds (3.3 kg) on standard care." Keep in mind that the experimental subjects weren't diet hobbyists with 10 or 15 pounds to lose. They were people who were rated as "obese" or "extremely obese" on the BMI chart. So if someone like me goes to WW and stays for a year -- presumably adhering reasonably well to the diet plan, or they wouldn't keep showing up to get weighed in -- they will lose 14.4 pounds in 52 weeks? And also, since the experimental subjects had their WW dues paid for them to participate, wouldn't even fewer people last for the full year if they were paying an average of $12 per week to NOT lose very much weight? It's the New Year's resolution season again, and all of last year's failures (many of whom have been coming back every January for years) will pick up the diet again, buy all the "new" products, and spend an average of over $300 on dues, products, and WW-branded foods before leaving again by the end of March. And when they stand on the meeting-room scale to be weighed in, the weigher will insinuate that any lack of weight loss was due to the members' failure to follow the plan precisely. And because there is such a culture of self-indulgence in Weight Watchers (from "indulgence" extra points to WW-branded ice cream and candy), even those who follow the plan exactly as written are getting too many calories, while shouldering all of the blame for poor results which are really the fault of the food plan itself. I happened to be weighing in at the local store at the same time as a WW meeting on the Monday after New Years. The week before, there had been only 4 attendees. Now there were almost 50 people there, and when the leader asked how many were newcomers who'd never been to Weight Watchers before, I saw only 5 hands raised. But the storefront (most WW meetings now happen in malls or shopping districts, at WW-brand stores which sell everything from scales and cookbooks to candy and soft-serve ice cream) was stocked with "brand-new and improved" stuff which is "soooo much better than last year" (though in fact the diet plan hasn't changed at all since 2010). As I said earlier, I only go to Weight Watchers to weigh in because it keeps my husband off my back. (He'd be appalled if he knew that I eat less than half of the recommended points, even though my personal method is still not really a "pro-ana" diet -- it's a high-protein CRON plan with moderate caloric restriction.) I feel guilty sometimes because I don't want vulnerable newcomers to think that I lost my weight by "doing Weight Watchers" as the plan is written. When I used to attend the meetings, I tried to get this point across during the discussions, though I got busted for it constantly, and have even been asked to not attend certain leaders' groups and forbidden to write on the Weight Watchers online forums. So this is why I'm so glad to be right here on MPA, where hardcore dieting (which, now that I've experienced Weight Watchers, I know is the same as "actually dieting consistently, and well enough to lose weight") is understood and appreciated. I love you guys!Old post but my favorite one. I went to 1200 calories a day. I was not losing weight eating all the points

#64 DebbiePT

DebbiePT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationMaryland

Posted 12 August 2018 - 05:57 AM

As some of you know, I started losing weight by following Weight Watchers Points Plus.

 

It didn't take me very long to figure out that my weight loss would stall if I used all the "point" that were permitted for me (about 2000 calories).  So I quit using weekly "indulgence" points and exercise-based "activity" points, though I still continued to exercise.  Then I chose to use the minimum points acceptable to the Weight Watchers organization (about 1000 calories, not counting fruit and vegetables), and to make a long story short, I settled upon a 900-ish calorie daily intake as best for longterm weight loss AND live-ability.  

 

My goal was to adjust the Weight Watchers plan so that I could stay on it forever without being tempted to binge, and strangely enough, the more precisely I designed my pseudo-WW plan, the easier it became to follow it.  "Indulging" myself with sugar and flour, even within my daily calorie allowance, was instantly trigger-y for me, as were fried foods, processed foods, regular dairy or meats (I need skim milk, lowfat cheese, 96% or leaner meat), crunchy snacks, etc.  I need to pre-plan my meals, fast between an early dinner and a late breakfast, focus on lean protein and fresh fruit/veg, exercise 10 hours per week, and so on.

 

So in the end, my diet doesn't look much like Weight Watchers anymore.  My husband still wants me to attend the meetings, so I go to the meeting room, get weighed in, then hang out in the Humane Society cat adoption room at Petco.  Because it's hard for me to keep my mouth shut when asked how I've lost 53 pounds since April, though I've been reprimanded from one side of WW to the other (in person and online) for telling the truth.

 

Recent Weight Watchers ads have been touting a double-blind scientific study which shows that Weight Watchers members lose twice as much as other dieters.  I wondered how this was possible, since I wasn't seeing many successful people at meetings (okay, I wasn't seeing ANY, except for hobby dieters who wanted to lose 5 pounds), and the calorie numbers weren't adding up.  Remember that at 246 pounds, I was given points that were the equivalent of 2000 calories, and could earn more by not-really-exercise "activities" like standing up during TV commercials.

 

So I just read the study report, and wouldn't you know it!  Here's the truth beneath that "lose twice as much weight" headline:

 

[For everyone who joined Weight Watchers, whether they stuck with it or not...], "the average weight loss at 12 months was 11.2 pounds (5.1 kilograms) for those using Weight Watchers versus 4.8 pounds (2.2 kg) for those on standard care. For those who completed the full 12 months, average weight loss was 14.4 pounds (6.7 kg) on Weight Watchers versus 7.2 pounds (3.3 kg) on standard care."

 

Keep in mind that the experimental subjects weren't diet hobbyists with 10 or 15 pounds to lose.  They were people who were rated as "obese" or "extremely obese" on the BMI chart.

 

So if someone like me goes to WW and stays for a year -- presumably adhering reasonably well to the diet plan, or they wouldn't keep showing up to get weighed in -- they will lose 14.4 pounds in 52 weeks?  And also, since the experimental subjects had their WW dues paid for them to participate, wouldn't even fewer people last for the full year if they were paying an average of $12 per week to NOT lose very much weight?

 

It's the New Year's resolution season again, and all of last year's failures (many of whom have been coming back every January for years) will pick up the diet again, buy all the "new" products, and spend an average of over $300 on dues, products, and WW-branded foods before leaving again by the end of March.  

 

And when they stand on the meeting-room scale to be weighed in, the weigher will insinuate that any lack of weight loss was due to the members' failure to follow the plan precisely.  And because there is such a culture of self-indulgence in Weight Watchers (from "indulgence" extra points to WW-branded ice cream and candy), even those who follow the plan exactly as written are getting too many calories, while shouldering all of the blame for poor results which are really the fault of the food plan itself.

 

I happened to be weighing in at the local store at the same time as a WW meeting on the Monday after New Years.  The week before, there had been only 4 attendees.  Now there were almost 50 people there, and when the leader asked how many were newcomers who'd never been to Weight Watchers before, I saw only 5 hands raised.  But the storefront (most WW meetings now happen in malls or shopping districts, at WW-brand stores which sell everything from scales and cookbooks to candy and soft-serve ice cream) was stocked with "brand-new and improved" stuff which is "soooo much better than last year" (though in fact the diet plan hasn't changed at all since 2010).

 

As I said earlier, I only go to Weight Watchers to weigh in because it keeps my husband off my back.  (He'd be appalled if he knew that I eat less than half of the recommended points, even though my personal method is still not really a "pro-ana" diet -- it's a high-protein CRON plan with moderate caloric restriction.)  I feel guilty sometimes because I don't want vulnerable newcomers to think that I lost my weight by "doing Weight Watchers" as the plan is written.  When I used to attend the meetings, I tried to get this point across during the discussions, though I got busted for it constantly, and have even been asked to not attend certain leaders' groups and forbidden to write on the Weight Watchers online forums.

 

So this is why I'm so glad to be right here on MPA, where hardcore dieting (which, now that I've experienced Weight Watchers, I know is the same as "actually dieting consistently, and well enough to lose weight") is understood and appreciated.  I love you guys!  <3

 

 

This is my favorite post. I joined weight watchers 3 weeks ago and have not lost a pound. On the new freesyle program all fruit is 0 points. It is steering me to eat more fruits and vegtavles, but I still have to limit the amount of fruits due to the sugar. 

 

I was told to celebrate "non scale victories". The reason I joined was for scale victories!

 

 

The good thing is it has me eating healthier. 

 

 

My binging completely stopped, because I stopped restricting too hard. 

 

 

The good thing is I COMPLETELY stopped binging. How could I? I was full from all the fruit and points. Now its time to reduce the intake. 

 

Fruit may be 0 points...but truth is they do have calories and sugar. Nothing is free. 

 

I first read this thread years ago and I think it will always be my favorite because its so true!



#65 nalgene_tangerine

nalgene_tangerine

    Advanced Guru

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 676 posts
  • Locationur moms house

Posted 25 August 2018 - 07:31 PM

when i did WW as a tween i lost 10lbs in 3 months. such bs tbh 


  • OKaP likes this
 

5d312a50e2092a242cf39cfe381fbf16

 

i lov him

 


#66 Karebear2

Karebear2

    Advanced Sage

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1548 posts
  • LocationUk

Posted 12 December 2019 - 09:14 AM

I have followed the program too. I have never used my bonus points and have lost 25 lbs in 4 months. I don't even use my 26 points per day. My problem is that during my once a month female time ( ha ha being P.C. Here), I gain an extra lb or 2 or 4, of water weight. Weight watchers will never acknowledge that. They told me that I gained weight because I didn't eat all of my points. That I don't eat enough. Hmmmm, really. The whole place is filled with women that starve themselves then gain weight? I think not! The following week I'm back to normal, but that isn't acknowledged at all.
Maybe this is just a rant, but the program could work for someone who needs to learn how to eat right, but for someone with an Ed, it's just a trigger.


That’s crazy! When I followed ww about 10 years ago, I lost a lot of weight and if I gained and didn’t know why they always asked if I was on or due on. I had a great experience with it. But I didn’t use my extra points very often either and not sure if I was on an old system or new one?? Does anyone have anything to weigh in on slimming world?! I think that plans is absolute pants!
On my way back down the rabbit hole..

#67 svana

svana

    Sage

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 936 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 06 March 2020 - 10:25 PM

, so I go to the meeting room, get weighed in, then hang out in the Humane Society cat adoption room at Petco. 

 

 

This whole thread is important but honestly this line is my favorite part. What a mood  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:


If I fall apart artistically, does that redeem it and make it beautiful?

 

Spoiler

#68 Birdyboned

Birdyboned

    Warrior

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 17 March 2020 - 10:13 PM

My mother has been following ww recently I’m not sure for how long but maybe the past year and has lost 50 pounds so it is working for her. Though I can’t say how well she sticks to it

#69 lurkerr

lurkerr

    Newbie

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 27 April 2020 - 09:49 AM

tksaln






Recent blog entries on this topic

Photo

From: Success? You call this success?

By MercurialVenus in Isafeye's Blog, on 09 October 2014 - 09:22 PM

Source: Success? You call this success?

Read Full Entry →

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users