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Changes with the DSM-5 (TW TW TW)

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#1 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:24 PM

So with the new DSM (the DSM-5) there have been changes regarding diagnostic criteria for anorexia, bulimia, and BED

 

 

This article ONLY outlines what CHANGES have been made, not the full diagnostic criteria that exists in the DSM-5

 

http://www.anad.org/...noses-in-dsm-v/

 

http://www.dsm5.org/... Fact Sheet.pdf

 

 

I've seen a few posts regarding anorexia vs. EDNOS and thought some people might appreciate knowing this.

 

 

From the DSM-5:

 

Diagnostic Criteria

  1. Restriction of energy intake relative to requirements, leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health. Significantly low weight is defined as a weight that is less than minimally normal or, for children and adolescents, less than that minimally expected.

  2. Intense fear of gaining weight or of becoming fat, or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain, even though at a significantly low weight.

  3. Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight.

Coding note: The ICD-9-CM code for anorexia nervosa is 307.1, which is assigned regardless of the subtype. The ICD-10-CM code depends on the subtype (see below).

Specify whether:

  • (F50.01) Restricting type: During the last 3 months, the individual has not engaged in recurrent episodes of binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas). This subtype describes presentations in which weight loss is accomplished primarily through dieting, fasting, and/or excessive exercise.

  • (F50.02) Binge-eating/purging type: During the last 3 months, the individual has engaged in recurrent episodes of binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas).

Specify if:

  • In partial remission: After full criteria for anorexia nervosa were previously met, Criterion A (low body weight) has not been met for a sustained period, but either Criterion B (intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat or behavior that interferes with weight gain) or Criterion C (disturbances in self-perception of weight and shape) is still met.

  • In full remission: After full criteria for anorexia nervosa were previously met, none of the criteria have been met for a sustained period of time.

Specify current severity:

The minimum level of severity is based, for adults, on current body mass index (BMI) (see below) or, for children and adolescents, on BMI percentile. The ranges below are derived from World Health Organization categories for thinness in adults; for children and adolescents, corresponding BMI percentiles should be used. The level of severity may be increased to reflect clinical symptoms, the degree of functional disability, and the need for supervision.

  • Mild: BMI ≥ 17 kg/m2

  • Moderate: BMI 16–16.99 kg/m2

  • Severe: BMI 15–15.99 kg/m2

  • Extreme: BMI < 15 kg/m2

 
Subtypes

Most individuals with the binge-eating/purging type of anorexia nervosa who binge eat also purge through self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas. Some individuals with this subtype of anorexia nervosa do not binge eat but do regularly purge after the consumption of small amounts of food.

Crossover between the subtypes over the course of the disorder is not uncommon; therefore, subtype description should be used to describe current symptoms rather than longitudinal course.

 
Diagnostic Features

There are three essential features of anorexia nervosa: persistent energy intake restriction; intense fear of gaining weight or of becoming fat, or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain; and a disturbance in self-perceived weight or shape. The individual maintains a body weight that is below a minimally normal level for age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health (Criterion A). Individuals’ body weights frequently meet this criterion following a significant weight loss, but among children and adolescents, there may alternatively be failure to make expected weight gain or to maintain a normal developmental trajectory (i.e., while growing in height) instead of weight loss (Rosen and American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Adolescence 2010).

Criterion A requires that the individual’s weight be significantly low (i.e., less than minimally normal or, for children and adolescents, less than that minimally expected). Weight assessment can be challenging because normal weight range differs among individuals, and different thresholds have been published defining thinness or underweight status (Thomas et al. 2009). Body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms/height in meters2) is a useful measure to assess body weight for height. For adults, a BMI of 18.5 kg/m2 has been employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (World Health Organization 1995) as the lower limit of normal body weight. Therefore, most adults with a BMI greater than or equal to 18.5 kg/m2 would not be considered to have a significantly low body weight. On the other hand, a BMI of lower than 17.0 kg/m2 has been considered by the WHO to indicate moderate or severe thinness (World Health Organization 1995); therefore, an individual with a BMI less than 17.0 kg/m2 would likely be considered to have a significantly low weight. An adult with a BMI between 17.0 and 18.5 kg/m2, or even above 18.5 kg/m2, might be considered to have a significantly low weight if clinical history or other physiological information supports this judgment.

For children and adolescents, determining a BMI-for-age percentile is useful (see, e.g., the CDC BMI percentile calculator for children and teenagers (; http://apps.nccd.cdc...u:2048/dnpabmi/)). As for adults, it is not possible to provide definitive standards for judging whether a child’s or an adolescent’s weight is significantly low, and variations in developmental trajectories among youth limit the utility of simple numerical guidelines. The CDC has used a BMI-for-age below the 5th percentile as suggesting underweight; however, children and adolescents with a BMI above this benchmark may be judged to be significantly underweight in light of failure to maintain their expected growth trajectory. In summary, in determining whether Criterion A is met, the clinician should consider available numerical guidelines, as well as the individual’s body build, weight history, and any physiological disturbances.

Individuals with this disorder typically display an intense fear of gaining weight or of becoming fat (Criterion B) (Yager and Andersen 2005). This intense fear of becoming fat is usually not alleviated by weight loss. In fact, concern about weight gain may increase even as weight falls. Younger individuals with anorexia nervosa, as well as some adults, may not recognize or acknowledge a fear of weight gain (Becker et al. 2009). In the absence of another explanation for the significantly low weight, clinician inference drawn from collateral history, observational data, physical and laboratory findings, or longitudinal course either indicating a fear of weight gain or supporting persistent behaviors that prevent it may be used to establish Criterion B.

The experience and significance of body weight and shape are distorted in these individuals (Criterion C) (Attia and Walsh 2007; Yager and Andersen 2005). Some individuals feel globally overweight. Others realize that they are thin but are still concerned that certain body parts, particularly the abdomen, buttocks, and thighs, are “too fat.” They may employ a variety of techniques to evaluate their body size or weight, including frequent weighing, obsessive measuring of body parts, and persistent use of a mirror to check for perceived areas of “fat.” The self-esteem of individuals with anorexia nervosa is highly dependent on their perceptions of body shape and weight. Weight loss is often viewed as an impressive achievement and a sign of extraordinary self-discipline, whereas weight gain is perceived as an unacceptable failure of self-control. Although some individuals with this disorder may acknowledge being thin, they often do not recognize the serious medical implications of their malnourished state.

Often, the individual is brought to professional attention by family members after marked weight loss (or failure to make expected weight gains) has occurred. If individuals seek help on their own, it is usually because of distress over the somatic and psychological sequelae of starvation. It is rare for an individual with anorexia nervosa to complain of weight loss per se. In fact, individuals with anorexia nervosa frequently either lack insight into or deny the problem. It is therefore often important to obtain information from family members or other sources to evaluate the history of weight loss and other features of the illness.

 
Associated Features Supporting Diagnosis

The semi-starvation of anorexia nervosa, and the purging behaviors sometimes associated with it, can result in significant and potentially life-threatening medical conditions. The nutritional compromise associated with this disorder affects most major organ systems and can produce a variety of disturbances. Physiological disturbances, including amenorrhea and vital sign abnormalities, are common. While most of the physiological disturbances associated with malnutrition are reversible with nutritional rehabilitation, some, including loss of bone mineral density, are often not completely reversible. Behaviors such as self-induced vomiting and misuse of laxatives, diuretics, and enemas may cause a number of disturbances that lead to abnormal laboratory findings; however, some individuals with anorexia nervosa exhibit no laboratory abnormalities (Mitchell and Crow 2006).

When seriously underweight, many individuals with anorexia nervosa have depressive signs and symptoms such as depressed mood, social withdrawal, irritability, insomnia, and diminished interest in sex (Attia and Walsh 2007; Yager and Andersen 2005). Because these features are also observed in individuals without anorexia nervosa who are significantly undernourished, many of the depressive features may be secondary to the physiological sequelae of semi-starvation (Keys et al. 1950), although they may also be sufficiently severe to warrant an additional diagnosis of major depressive disorder.

Obsessive-compulsive features, both related and unrelated to food, are often prominent. Most individuals with anorexia nervosa are preoccupied with thoughts of food. Some collect recipes or hoard food. Observations of behaviors associated with other forms of starvation suggest that obsessions and compulsions related to food may be exacerbated by undernutrition. When individuals with anorexia nervosa exhibit obsessions and compulsions that are not related to food, body shape, or weight, an additional diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be warranted.

Other features sometimes associated with anorexia nervosa include concerns about eating in public, feelings of ineffectiveness, a strong desire to control one’s environment, inflexible thinking, limited social spontaneity, and overly restrained emotional expression. Compared with individuals with anorexia nervosa, restricting type, those with binge-eating/purging type have higher rates of impulsivity and are more likely to abuse alcohol and other drugs (Yager and Andersen 2005).

A subgroup of individuals with anorexia nervosa show excessive levels of physical activity (Klein et al. 2007). Increases in physical activity often precede onset of the disorder, and over the course of the disorder increased activity accelerates weight loss. During treatment, excessive activity may be difficult to control, thereby jeopardizing weight recovery.

Individuals with anorexia nervosa may misuse medications, such as by manipulating dosage, in order to achieve weight loss or avoid weight gain. Individuals with diabetes mellitus may omit or reduce insulin doses in order to minimize carbohydrate metabolism.


  • g3rmwater likes this

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#2 ✿Serendipity☠♥

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:39 PM

gallery_68641_6624_8425.jpg

thought I'd add a graphic as well :)

 

I wonder if there is a better article though, because this is so opinionated rather than black and white facts on official diagnosis. It says "Anorexia nervosa is characterized by emaciation" emaciation is an adjective, adjectives are based off of personal perspectives, and we know BDD can alter those :/


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#3 luminous

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:43 PM

This post includes the criteria for the eating disorders included in the DSM V:

http://www.myproana....osis/?p=1820536

I think it is straight from the DSM V.


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#4 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:43 PM


 

I wonder if there is a better article though, because this is so opinionated rather than black and white facts on official diagnosis. It says "Anorexia nervosa is characterized by emaciation" emaciation is an adjective, adjectives are based off of personal perspectives, and we know BDD can alter those :/

I added the changes from the DSM website as well, they are roughly the same, but more official coming from the DSM site.


  • Moonfairy likes this

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#5 ✿Serendipity☠♥

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:45 PM

This post includes the criteria for the eating disorders included in the DSM V:

http://www.myproana....osis/?p=1820536

I think it is straight from the DSM V.

see that one says "leading to significantly low body weight is a core feature of anorexia nervosa." & "leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex,developmental trajectory, and physical health. Significantly low weight is defined as a weight that is less than minimally normal or, for children and adolescents, less than that minimally expected."

 

Specify current severity:
The minimum level of severity is based, for adults, on current body mass index (BMI) (see below) or, for children and
adolescents, on BMI percentile. The ranges below are derived from World Health Organization categories for thinness in
adults; for children and adolescents, corresponding BMI percentiles should be used. The level of severity may be increased
to reflect clinical symptoms, the degree of functional disability, and the need for supervision.
Mild: BMI ≥ 17 kg/m2
Moderate: BMI 16–16.99 kg/m2
Severe: BMI 15–15.99 kg/m2
Extreme: BMI < 15 kg/m2

 

BMI chart from the US government: https://www.nhlbi.ni...ity/bmi_tbl.pdf

 

which sounds more familiar......*goes to login to college library website*


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#6 rachelkaykay

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:51 PM

Okay, so I've been in "recovery" for a couple months now and my bmi is up from 17 to 20.  However, when I was recently hospitalized, I was again diagnosed with anorexia.  I thought an underweight bmi was required for diagnosis? I haven't had my period for a year and a half now though.  Has anyone else been diagnosed anorexic at a higher bmi?


Height: 5' 5"

HW: 155

LW:105

 


#7 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:54 PM

see that one says "leading to significantly low body weight is a core feature of anorexia nervosa." & "leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex,developmental trajectory, and physical health. Significantly low weight is defined as a weight that is less than minimally normal or, for children and adolescents, less than that minimally expected."

 

Specify current severity:
The minimum level of severity is based, for adults, on current body mass index (BMI) (see below) or, for children and
adolescents, on BMI percentile. The ranges below are derived from World Health Organization categories for thinness in
adults; for children and adolescents, corresponding BMI percentiles should be used. The level of severity may be increased
to reflect clinical symptoms, the degree of functional disability, and the need for supervision.
Mild: BMI ≥ 17 kg/m2
Moderate: BMI 16–16.99 kg/m2
Severe: BMI 15–15.99 kg/m2
Extreme: BMI < 15 kg/m2

 

BMI chart from the US government: https://www.nhlbi.ni...ity/bmi_tbl.pdf

 

which sounds more familiar......*goes to login to college library website*

I just copied and pasted from the DSM (went to my library site as well haha) onto the original post. I can do bulimia as well, but i think all this information is enough for this forum. Not sure how that smiley face made it in there...


  • ✿Serendipity☠♥ likes this

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#8 ✿Serendipity☠♥

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:59 PM

I just copied and pasted from the DSM (went to my library site as well haha) onto the original post. I can do bulimia as well, but i think all this information is enough for this forum. Not sure how that smiley face made it in there...

ok well according to your post " essential features of anorexia nervosa: The individual maintains a body weight that is below a minimally normal level for age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health.......For adults, a BMI of 18.5 kg/m2 has been employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (World Health Organization 1995) as the lower limit of normal body weight...Mild: BMI ≥ 17 kg/m2.."

 

 

 

so to be legitimately diagnosed with mild anorexia you would have to be between 17-18.5 bmi??


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#9 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:09 PM

ok well according to your post " essential features of anorexia nervosa: The individual maintains a body weight that is below a minimally normal level for age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health.......For adults, a BMI of 18.5 kg/m2 has been employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (World Health Organization 1995) as the lower limit of normal body weight...Mild: BMI ≥ 17 kg/m2.."



so to be legitimately diagnosed with mild anorexia you would have to be between 17-18.5 bmi??


"Weight assessment can be challenging because normal weight range differs among individuals, and different thresholds have been published defining thinness or underweight status (Thomas et al. 2009)."

^this I think is the important part about the BMI issue, you can still be diagnosed even at a higher BMI. It's from the DSM-5 so technically yes but I've been talking to my doctor and the sentence I just quoted is from the DSM is a huge change and allows the BMI criteria to be less strict or overridden by the two other main diagnostic components

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#10 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:10 PM

P.s. My Internet just shit all over everything so I'm doing this on my phone and sorry for the typos/other shitty phone things

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#11 ✿Serendipity☠♥

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:11 PM

I think is the important part about the BMI issue, you can still be diagnosed even at a higher BMI. It's from the DSM-5 so technically yes but I've been talking to my doctor and the sentence I just quoted is from the DSM is a huge change and allows the BMI criteria to be less strict or overridden by the two other main diagnostic components

I think because BMI is not an exact science because it does not count frame size or muscle density. But I think it works as a general overall, but in specific cases there should be exceptions, as there is.

 

as this by BMI standards is an obese man vvvv

arnold.jpg


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#12 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:16 PM

I think because BMI is not an exact science because it does not count frame size or muscle density. But I think it works as a general overall, but in specific cases there should be exceptions, as there is.

as this by BMI standards is an obese man vvvv
arnold.jpg


Hahaha absolutely agree with you, this leaves a little more breathing room for doctors and therapists

hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#13 Chang'e

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:28 PM

I giggled at the random smiley face in all that

Sw   151
       12
5

gw   120 

        115

         112

        109

  cw   104

Ugw 100

 

^this every time someone is eating near me ^

 

 


#14 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:30 PM

I giggled at the random smiley face in all that

haha yeah I'm not sure how that got in there, that citation must have had whatever symbols make the sunglasses face...sneaky DSM...


hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#15 AvoirFaim

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:31 PM

Okay, so I've been in "recovery" for a couple months now and my bmi is up from 17 to 20.  However, when I was recently hospitalized, I was again diagnosed with anorexia.  I thought an underweight bmi was required for diagnosis? I haven't had my period for a year and a half now though.  Has anyone else been diagnosed anorexic at a higher bmi?

It might technically fall under Atypical Anorexia, but maybe the doctor was considering your past weight history, and even if not it isn't like it's illegal to diagnose someone with AN when their bmi is over 18.5. I had a psychiatrist before who diagnosed me with something even though he admitted I didn't fit enough of the criteria. It really pissed me off that he wrote it down anyway, but he can do that.


HW: BMI 22.7
CW: ?
LW:  BMI 13.8
GW: ?

(stats are from the "New BMI" calculator)


#16 Wastedwintergirl

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:33 PM

Okay, so I've been in "recovery" for a couple months now and my bmi is up from 17 to 20.  However, when I was recently hospitalized, I was again diagnosed with anorexia.  I thought an underweight bmi was required for diagnosis? I haven't had my period for a year and a half now though.  Has anyone else been diagnosed anorexic at a higher bmi?

"Weight assessment can be challenging because normal weight range differs among individuals, and different thresholds have been published defining thinness or underweight status (Thomas et al. 2009)."

 

This allows doctors to assess patients on a more individual level and combined with your other behaviors, your doctor might have felt you still fell into anorexia with criteria B and C overriding criteria A


hw: 145lbs

cw: 101.0lbs

h: 5'6

bmi: 16.3

gw#1: 108lbs

gw#2: 103lbs

gw#3: 98lbs

ugw: 90lbs

 

I KNOW I'M UGLY BUT I GLOW AT NIGHT 

 

 


#17 Moonfairy

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 05:59 AM



so to be legitimately diagnosed with mild anorexia you would have to be between 17-18.5 bmi??


Um yeah, basically.
Despite the changes to the criteria most doctors I've spoken to about it still use these guidelines
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#18 Moonfairy

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 06:00 AM



This allows doctors to assess patients on a more individual level and combined with your other behaviors, your doctor might have felt you still fell into anorexia with criteria B and C overriding criteria A


But at least this is happening slightly more now

                                                                             

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sml_gallery_41500_14125_63291.gif

 

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#19 FINAL_GRRRL

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 06:06 AM

So basically I am still fat and have no disorder?
Lol
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#20 Bibliophile

Bibliophile

    Librarian of Sass

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 09:37 AM

Um yeah, basically.
Despite the changes to the criteria most doctors I've spoken to about it still use these guidelines

 

We use ICD in the UK don't we, which still has the 17.5 criteria...


#supermod

 

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[I was Rolling Stone’s “Hot Bukowski.” I was the toast of the town. I was puking flowers afterhours; I was letting everybody down]

 

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