Can you build muscle on a calorie deficit? - Page 3 - Muscle Dysmorphia - Forums and Community

Jump to content


About MPA

MPA is a site dedicated to the support or recovery of those suffering from eating disorders or body dysmorphic disorders. Please be sensitive to this fact when creating an account and contributing to the board.


Photo

Can you build muscle on a calorie deficit?

muscle calories

  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#41 caffeine fix

caffeine fix

    Guru

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 498 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 04 July 2019 - 12:48 PM

What is BCAA? 

 

And how to best maintain muscle on a deficit? What foods/exercises to eat/do?

 

I recently investigated whether to buy EAA or BCAA supplements and found this website's summary very helpful (although I am aware it is biased as it is clearly trying to sell EAA supplements). To try to answer your question...

 

Proteins are made up of amino acids

Our bodies are able to produce some amino acids on its own

But there are nine "Essential Amino Acids" (EAAs) that our bodies are not capable of synthesizing so it is "essential" that we consume these (eg foods/supplements)

Three of these EAAs are particularly involved in muscle metabolism/building - they are known as Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs - named as such due to their chemical structure) - and are the amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine.

 

You can buy BCAA supplements, which are often stated as a ratio of the amino acids. Eg. "2:1:1" is a popular ratio of Leucine : Isoleucine : Valine.

However a recent trend has been to supplement all 9 of the EAAs, rather than just focusing on just the 3 BCAAs.

 

I'm still not sure which is better for muscle building or overall health, but since I'm trying to make more and more vegan choices and am more likely to be deficient, I purchased these EAAs from Amazon which got good reviews. They only seem to have 8 EAAs though, I'm not sure why they excluded Histidine?



#42 Asov

Asov

    Advanced Warrior

  • Validating
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 432 posts

Posted 04 July 2019 - 02:40 PM

I recently investigated whether to buy EAA or BCAA supplements and found this website's summary very helpful (although I am aware it is biased as it is clearly trying to sell EAA supplements). To try to answer your question...
 
Proteins are made up of amino acids
Our bodies are able to produce some amino acids on its own
But there are nine "Essential Amino Acids" (EAAs) that our bodies are not capable of synthesizing so it is "essential" that we consume these (eg foods/supplements)
Three of these EAAs are particularly involved in muscle metabolism/building - they are known as Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs - named as such due to their chemical structure) - and are the amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine.
 
You can buy BCAA supplements, which are often stated as a ratio of the amino acids. Eg. "2:1:1" is a popular ratio of Leucine : Isoleucine : Valine.
However a recent trend has been to supplement all 9 of the EAAs, rather than just focusing on just the 3 BCAAs.
 
I'm still not sure which is better for muscle building or overall health, but since I'm trying to make more and more vegan choices and am more likely to be deficient, I purchased these EAAs from Amazon which got good reviews. They only seem to have 8 EAAs though, I'm not sure why they excluded Histidine?

BCAA's are useless if you eat enough protein

#43 flickerbeat

flickerbeat

    Omniscient

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2897 posts

Posted 04 July 2019 - 04:52 PM

 Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs - named as such due to their chemical structure)

Ah. Thanks for the links!

 

 

BCAA's are useless if you eat enough protein

Because protein is comprised of amino acids...

 

 

Are there any exercises that specifically help maintain muscle mass (whilst eating at a deficit, obviously including sufficient protein)?


Stats:

Spoiler

 

nonbinary [they/them]

come make fun of me here

I've AWOLed to My Pancake Addiction

B) i'm different from all the other snowflakes, i swear B) 


#44 caffeine fix

caffeine fix

    Guru

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 498 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 05 July 2019 - 04:41 AM

BCAA's are useless if you eat enough protein

I assume you mean 'BCAA supplements are useless if you consume enough protein-rich food'.

Which is correct. However, I am vegetarian with a leaning towards veganism, so I am not convinced I consume sufficient quantities of EAAs through my diet. Of course I could improve this by making dietary changes, but I've gone with the easy option and bought an EAA supplement to be on the safe side, especially since I exercise a lot.



#45 caffeine fix

caffeine fix

    Guru

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 498 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 05 July 2019 - 04:48 AM

Are there any exercises that specifically help maintain muscle mass (whilst eating at a deficit, obviously including sufficient protein)?

I believe high-resistance low-repetition exercises are the best for maintaining muscle mass when restricting (eg lifting weights, squats etc). But I think basically whatever muscles you exercise when restricting do gain some protection, even if it's not high-resistance-low-rep/... Eg cardio exercises like running will probably give some protection to your leg muscles.

 

I'm not an expert though, so that may be incorrect!


  • flickerbeat likes this

#46 flickerbeat

flickerbeat

    Omniscient

  • Accountability access
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2897 posts

Posted 05 July 2019 - 08:27 AM

I believe high-resistance low-repetition exercises are the best for maintaining muscle mass when restricting (eg lifting weights, squats etc). But I think basically whatever muscles you exercise when restricting do gain some protection, even if it's not high-resistance-low-rep/... Eg cardio exercises like running will probably give some protection to your leg muscles.

 

I'm not an expert though, so that may be incorrect!

Thanks! So are bodyweight exercises (such as push-ups, pull-ups, planks, sit-ups, and as you mentioned, squats) good equivalents for those who don't have access to free weights or a lifting apparatus?

 

I do cycle (with the highest resistance available) and I've been at an average 1100 deficit (accounting for TDEE) for the past few weeks, yet my legs are thick as ever... Perhaps this is why. ^_^

 

 

Edit: Months later and now I know the difference between bodyweight exercises and strength training 


Stats:

Spoiler

 

nonbinary [they/them]

come make fun of me here

I've AWOLed to My Pancake Addiction

B) i'm different from all the other snowflakes, i swear B) 




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: muscle, calories

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users