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best to worst: books you had to read in school


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#1 epicnutt

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 10:10 AM

i was talking to my brother about thos today, and thought it would be fun to see other peoples opinions on it. i know not everyone has read the exact same books for school, but there are a few that i know everyone read, so im just gonna list the most well known ones for mine.

1: to kill a mockingbird,
i really liked this book, it had a really nice story and really nice characters. scout was such a cute little tomboy, and Atticus was the best dad to her and jem. The trial part of the book was super engaging, i remeber reading ahead alot when we got to that section. the movie was also really good, and the casting was perfect.

2: the outsiders
amazing movie, great book. the whole vibe of the story was really cool with the whole greasers vs socs thing, and johny was such a cutie. the movie helped launch alot of the big actors in the 80's careers, and ngl they were pretty hot. the reason its bellow tkam is because i didnt like the writing style as much, but im no writing critic so i could be totaly wrong about that.

3: monster
this book was really good, and they really need to make a movie out of it. i forgot the mc's name but he was such an interesting and intelligent character, and it had a super creative way of telling the story.

4: of mice and men
i thought the way the portrayed lennie was pretty good, but of course there was still issues with it. this one had alot of sad moments in it, the ones i remeber most was when that dude shot the guys dog because it smelled bad, and the owner felt really guilty about it, and the ending. i dont remeber the movie since i slept through it though, so idk how good it was lol.

5: unwind
idk if this is a really well known one, but i thought it had some really cool concepts. it was just a bit to hard for me to belive everything though. i dont think parents would retroactively abort their kids by sending them away when they turn 13. the clappers were a cool idea, and the overal story was good but it was just a bit too unrealistic to get higher on my list.

6: touching spirit bear.
bro, this book suckeeddd. like, it sucked. it has the same problem as the last one. why would they send a kid with anger issues and problems with violence to go fend for himself alone in the woods? like, seriously? the writing itself wasnt bad, but the whole concept was just weird. i wasnt into it.

7: speak
i hated this book so much. it litterally made me mad while reading it. the whole thing is about the mystery of whay happend at the party, but its so obvious what happend. i really didnt like how they portrayed her depression and dealing with the aftermath of what happend, it seemed so cliche. the whole book was just a bunch of highschool stereotypes and bad writing. it was like, im 14 and this is deep the book.


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#2 BatDuck

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 11:41 AM

My memory is fuzzy about which were read in high school and which were middle school, but I love the idea of this ranking.

 

1: Of Mice And Men

obvious classic, we all loved it

 

2: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

I didn't really think much of this book while I was reading it, but it really sticks out in my memory as one I enjoyed more

 

3: Lord of the Flies

look if there's one thing high school kids can relate to, it's other high school kids. I feel like in my school at least, we all sort of understood the kids fear and frustration of like "there's no one to tell us what to do so what the hell do we do," and we also sort of rallied behind Piggy and felt for him. It's interesting to explore the power dynamic between all the boys and see how they all devolved into such terrible things, it somewhat reminds me of the Stanford Prison Experiment. 

 

4: The Color Purple

This one was really enlightening to a teenager; there are a lot of complex topics and emotions that younger people haven't experienced yet, but it's just as important to learn them

 

5: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

yes, I'm aware of the racial implications associated with this book. I still think it's a worthy read because it's a window into that time period, especially with Huck's changing relationship with Jim, and how Huck Finn treats Jim throughout the book. It's an interesting dynamic that is important to understand imo. Also just a cool story outside of the racial stuff

 

6: The Great Gatsby

basically every character is either annoying/rude/terrible, but still a decent read. Jay Gatsby is a bit of a slimeball but whatev

 

7: Great Expectations

I know for a fact that I read this book but I cannot tell you a single thing that happened in it. It was that boring.

 

8: Romeo and Juliet/Hamlet/Macbeth/Midsummer Nights Dream/Julius Caesar

ok like look, I like Shakespeare, I think he's cool, nice guy, whatever Even though lowkey Frances Bacon ghostwrote all of Shakespeares work but we aren't gonna get into that Like I respect him, I respect his work, it's fine. My issue here is that these are not novels, these are plays, so like why do we read these in english class when they should be meant for drama students? I had to read all of these plays and I mean Midsummer Nights Dream is a fuckin bop I won't lie, but anyone else here who has any type of learning disability or attention problems or anything of that sort will understand that reading a play script is a whole different ballgame from reading a book. Reading a script like this, for me, is just fuckin difficult. It's meant to be performed, not read, so reading these in high school was just a big headache, but then ofc the teacher would try to make us "perform" with popcorn reading, but like that doesn't make it better my guy.

stories 9/10

reading experience -40/10 git fugged

 

 

Honorable mentions: Fahrenheit 451 and The Crucible; Read them, liked them, remember them fondly, have no other thoughts.


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#3 NLP

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 12:36 PM

Under Milk Wood -  Dylan Thomas - I still read it now every now and then, maybe it was brought to life because we had audio version concurrently

 

Henry V - It was so boring, maybe above my head, it felt like watching paint dry


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#4 wasting

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Posted 07 September 2020 - 11:32 PM

Best:

Speak- I loved the way it was written, it was and still is such an important topic for teens to read and it wasn't written 100 years ago!

Lord of the Flies -teen boys behaving badly whilst symbolizing modern society? Yes please

Woman warrior- I loved the writing of this book, the characters felt real, the stories were amazing especially the one of fa Mulan And the way the stories expressed the power of women and also showcasing the racism and culture shock Asian Americans face was also amazing

Frankenstein- my Favorite all time book, the gothic atmosphere , the monster just wanting to be loved and accepted, this book grabbed teenage me and never let go

The Narrative Life of a Fredrick Douglass- one of the best memoirs I ever read, it was written very well and made me cry and boil with rage, an all time fav

Honorable Mentions: Jane Eyre, the Crucible, Catcher in the Rye(Holden spoke to 15 year old me), The Stranger(my first step into existentialism and I loved it still do) and The Scarlett Letter

The Bad:

Heart of Darkness: I get war flashbacks when I think of this book. It was boring, so so so boring and dull and Nothin Ever happened. I'm sorry to this book but I did not like it

To Kill a Mocking Bird- Fitted with a white savior narrative to solely comfort present Americans that the US is No longer racist, yep racism is over because One white man the Only white man was a black man's lawyer yay! the fact that the Only black character was an accused rapist and a side character used as a stepping stone to further the development of a young white girl...nope And why are schools still pushing a book about racism written 60 something years ago by a white woman? There are so many recently written books on racism for teens written by black and brown authors....

Beloved: I got the message and the fact that it is one, if not the only, /praised classic written by a black woman but it was so boring, stream of consciousness is not my thing, also there was a scene about young men being so horny F'ing cows because there were not a lot of women around...ew, I've tried many times to get into this book and I never get past page 23
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#5 Arkangel

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 09:07 AM

Best:

Speak- I loved the way it was written, it was and still is such an important topic for teens to read and it wasn't written 100 years ago!

Lord of the Flies -teen boys behaving badly whilst symbolizing modern society? Yes please

Woman warrior- I loved the writing of this book, the characters felt real, the stories were amazing especially the one of fa Mulan And the way the stories expressed the power of women and also showcasing the racism and culture shock Asian Americans face was also amazing

Frankenstein- my Favorite all time book, the gothic atmosphere , the monster just wanting to be loved and accepted, this book grabbed teenage me and never let go

The Narrative Life of a Fredrick Douglass- one of the best memoirs I ever read, it was written very well and made me cry and boil with rage, an all time fav

Honorable Mentions: Jane Eyre, the Crucible, Catcher in the Rye(Holden spoke to 15 year old me), The Stranger(my first step into existentialism and I loved it still do) and The Scarlett Letter

The Bad:

Heart of Darkness: I get war flashbacks when I think of this book. It was boring, so so so boring and dull and Nothin Ever happened. I'm sorry to this book but I did not like it

To Kill a Mocking Bird- Fitted with a white savior narrative to solely comfort present Americans that the US is No longer racist, yep racism is over because One white man the Only white man was a black man's lawyer yay! the fact that the Only black character was an accused rapist and a side character used as a stepping stone to further the development of a young white girl...nope And why are schools still pushing a book about racism written 60 something years ago by a white woman? There are so many recently written books on racism for teens written by black and brown authors....

Beloved: I got the message and the fact that it is one if not the only awarded/praised classic written by a black woman but it was so boring, steam of consciousness is not my thing, also there was a scene about young men being so horny F'ing cows because there were not a lot of women around...ew, I've tried many times to get into this book and I never get past page 23

I loved the idea of reading lord of the flies but in reality, I couldn't pass the first third of book :/


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#6 Alexander Hamilton

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Posted 13 September 2020 - 10:49 PM

I was homeschooled so I had an assigned classic to read every week so I’ve literally read hundreds of books for school but boy do some of them stand out

1.) Frankenstein AKA my fav work of fiction of all time it’s just *chef’s kiss*

2.) East of Eden. I was 15 when I read it so I don’t remember much but I remember it being chunky and i stayed up late reading it for three nights straight

3.) Mere Christianity. C.S. Lewis is my all time fav author so not much more to say

4.) Crime and Punishment was fucked up I also enjoyed that shit

5.) Jane Eyre b I t c h

Books I fucking hated:

1.) Gulliver’s Travels can suck my fat ass I fucking hated this shitty ass book

2.) anything by Shakespeare bc he’s overrated and I hate him personally

4.) The Hobbit. Yeah I said it.

5.) Alice in Wonderland. Damn I hated this
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#7 shiju333

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Posted 14 September 2020 - 04:08 AM

Best: "Ordinary People" written in 1976, and what felt like the only relatable book ever taught to a teenager with depression (undiagnosed at that point) in the early 2000s.

I was college bound; this book was the alternate to the traditional college bound book, but I chose it anyway beauethe topic was suicide. I'm actually reading it again as an adult it was so memorable.

I was a huge reader in high school, yet I hated and slogged through most of what was foisted on my small town predominantly white school. ~boring!
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#8 BatDuck

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 06:42 AM

I was homeschooled so I had an assigned classic to read every week so I’ve literally read hundreds of books for school but boy do some of them stand out

1.) Frankenstein AKA my fav work of fiction of all time it’s just *chef’s kiss*

2.) East of Eden. I was 15 when I read it so I don’t remember much but I remember it being chunky and i stayed up late reading it for three nights straight

3.) Mere Christianity. C.S. Lewis is my all time fav author so not much more to say

4.) Crime and Punishment was fucked up I also enjoyed that shit

5.) Jane Eyre b I t c h

Books I fucking hated:

1.) Gulliver’s Travels can suck my fat ass I fucking hated this shitty ass book

2.) anything by Shakespeare bc he’s overrated and I hate him personally

4.) The Hobbit. Yeah I said it.

5.) Alice in Wonderland. Damn I hated this


Some of you bitches got to read Frankenstein in school and I'm hella jealous. I had to seek that out on my own time while reading bullshit for class, y'all lucky asf
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#9 hippo-hips

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 04:56 AM

Some of these aren't traditional books read in school. I was homeschooled for a year due to bullying. 

 

Best books:

1. To Kill A Mockingbird: It was very engaging and I liked the characters in this book. Gives you an idea of what it was like to grow up in a small town back in the old days.

 

2. The Secret: This helped me to focus on my goals like learning to drive and not eating my feelings. 

 

3. The Last Lecture: Randy seemed like a good guy. I thought that was really sweet that he did the last lecture as something for his kids to remember him by when he was gone. 

 

4. Tuesdays with Morrie: I thought Mitch's relationship with his old college professor Morrie was really sweet. 

 

5. The Yellow Wallpaper: As a depressed teen I related to this woman's narrative. 

 

Worst Books:

1. Romeo and Juliet: It was so overrated and difficult to understand. 

 

2. Beowulf: I couldn't tell you anything about Beowulf except that it's so boring!

 

3. Three Cups of Tea: I had to read this for book club. One of the kids jokingly called it Three Cups of Crap. I agree with him lol. 

 

4. My Antonia: I literally don't remember anything about this book except that it's not something I'd choose to read on my own.


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#10 Oakley❅

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 04:58 AM

I read the uglies series in middle school and was OBSESSED, still trying to get them from my library to this day lol

Worst for me was that one book with all the kids on the island, children of the flies? That’s prob wrong LOL but only bcuz I didn’t get it and felt stupid when my classmate explained it to me

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#11 pumpkin seed

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 11:51 AM

my fav book that we read in school was probably the great gatsby, but i also like reading to kill a mockingbird, frankenstein, the crucible, the breadwinner, and the giver.

 

we read life of pi in 9th grade but our teacher just summarized the assigned reading for the week in class every week so i didn't bother to read the book and just went based off her summaries and sparknotes. we watched the movie in class though and it was alright

 

we read shakespeare a few times in highschool too but i'm too stoopid to really understand the older style of writing lmao so i pretty much relied on summaries to understand what was going on. i think i would've enjoyed the stories more had i been able to read them more easily, though.

 

in french class (mandatory second language where i live), we read the count of monte cristo and i enjoyed it and wanna re-read it again in english!


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#12 ArCeMo

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 12:50 PM

I don't remember them, but did anyone else have to read old English books in 9th grade? We basically started the year with Sophocles' Antigone, which is just a translated Greek tragedy (Shakespeare before Shakespeare was popular) and then we had to read things like Gilgamesh? And Beowulf? Gilgamesh ridiculously old too, it's translated from an old mesoamerican language. And Beowulf is written in old English... whyyyy? Why do English teachers feel the needs to hurt us like this?


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#13 Willam

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 01:23 AM

This is by no means a comprehensive list, this is just what I remember and covers middle school through some of college. 

 

Worst:

-A Tale of Two Cities, sorry but Charles Dickens is so overrated and fucking BORING. 

-The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Assigning a 1000 page book to read on summer vacation was cruel and everything that happened did not need that many pages to explain it, he's worse than Victor Hugo 

-The Grapes of Wrath by Jon Steinbeck. I enjoyed the ending but everything else was boring. Didn't enjoy East of Eden either.

-The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Honestly anything by Mark Twain was boring. 

 

Best: 

-Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? by Michael Sandel. Absolutely loved debating and discussing ideas from this book, it had a lot of practical application and was the start of my radicalization lmao 

-Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris. My introduction to Sedaris, and I fell in love. I hadn't laughed at a book in so long but this was so refreshing. 

-The Yellow Wallpaper, The Bell Jar, and Prozac Nation. Depressed women narratives? Relatable. 

-The Crucible by Arthur Miller. I just love the themes and drama of it all, learning about McCarthyism alongside it, watching the movies. 

-I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. My introduction into poetry and I still love her. 

-Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. It was tragic, poignant, and yes it made me mad, but more at her situation than anything. 

 

Medium:

-Of Mice and Men. I'm not a big Steinbeck fan but the ending is classic. 

-Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet, Hamlet, & Othello. I hate a lot of the actions of the characters but I can appreciate the drama

-They Cage the Animals at Night, Touching Spirit Bear. Both were touching but kind of harsh to read at 11-12 years old 

-The Lightning Thief. We read it the year the movie came out and the movie ruined it lmao 

-I did enjoy reading the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Odyssey, The Aeneid, Beowulf, the Tao te Ching, the Baghavad Ghita, and other cultural classics for widening my perspectives 

-George Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm. He's biased obv but both are classics that are referenced all the time and 1984 is one I come back to once in a while 


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#14 gloomaglisten

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:39 AM

I know I’m forgetting a lot but here’s what I remember from high school specifically, best to worst (not counting short stories but just know that The Most Dangerous Game is on a whole other level for me)

-EDIT: I cannot fucking believe I forgot to include my actual favourite thing I read for class in high school, which is Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. How did that slip my mind??? It’s been almost 3 months since I made this post what is WRONG with me 

 

-The Women of Brewster Place: Actually an enjoyable read, albeit with its flaws, but I remember actually seeking out the television series based on it outside of class. I didn’t end up watching much of it though unfortunately.

-Hamlet: Honestly I don’t even know if it belongs this high on the list but it’s probably my favourite of all the Shakespeare I’ve read, and I really couldn’t say why. Hamlet bursting onto the scene and jumping into Ophelia’s grave to one-up her grieving brother is very funny to me though I will say that.

-Macbeth: Again, one of the more interesting Shakespeare plays. And I enjoy things like the witches’ prophecies with their loopholes, and thinking of other ways the characters could’ve gotten around them, like the “no man of woman born can kill Macbeth” twist.

-The Great Gatsby: Put this above TKAM at the last minute lol. I can’t say I loved this book but I didn’t hate it, and I was able to understand it. I like jokes about this book too (of COURSE I’m blanking on every one I’ve ever heard now) and I did really well on the whole Gatsby unit so there’s that. It’s also a relatively short read as I recall, which is a point in its favour.

-To Kill a Mockingbird: I can definitely see the problems with it, and I can’t say I loved reading it, but I thought it was okay as far as “classics” go. I do remember having a couple of class discussions on it though where I forced myself to speak up on two separate occasions because we were graded on it and both times everyone else shut down what I had to say and one time the teacher made like a cringing face at what I’d said, from her seat about three feet away from me where I could clearly see her, so I naturally didn’t say anything else during any of the other discussions and then I got a level 1 (lowest mark) on the class discussion segment of the assignment and I’m clearly still bitter about that so I can’t say this book wasn’t memorable I guess.

-Romeo and Juliet: Didn’t love it, nor did I care about any of the characters except Mercutio. But as far as stories go, it was okay I guess. Can’t say I hate it but I also can’t say I give a shit about it.

-Funny Boy: I’m gonna be honest...this is mainly here because I barely remember it. I don’t think I liked it at the time, despite the fact that I usually really lean into stories about gay characters. But who knows how I’d feel if I read it today? It is a mystery.

-Othello: Least favourite of every Shakespeare play I’ve ever read. It was so boring to me...literally the same exact thing happens for three acts in a row and then everyone dies at once. I remember acting it out in English class for our culminating assignment and the teacher went on and on about what a good job she thought I did but like...it was literally just yelling at people...it wasn’t exactly stellar acting, ma’am. This is the same teacher who hated my contributions to the TKAM discussions so I don’t really know what her game was. Anyway,

-The Chrysalids: I don’t like dystopias. Honestly, I read this book nine years ago, so maybe I’d like it more now than I did back then, but I couldn’t wait for this unit to be over. Unfortunately, grade 9 was the year of dystopias and R&J

-Brave New World: Same shit except longer book, more confusing, and somehow even more boring. Honestly, I think the fact that I dislike it so much is more a reflection on me not being cultured or smart enough to really “get” it, so it’s not really that the book is necessarily bad, it just wasn’t for me and I’m really glad I never have to read it again.


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#15 RedDeer

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 03:04 PM

I was homeschooled so I had an assigned classic to read every week so I’ve literally read hundreds of books for school but boy do some of them stand out

 

I was also homeschooled (online classes) but my literature education was rather spotty. I took an AP lit course and a few summer courses in high school that were more like book clubs.

FWIW 

 

Best:

1. Kafka's Metamorphosis - Story of my life right here. I refuse to accept any interpretation that does not involve mental illness. (this was actually for a college course)

2. Crime and Punishment - I read this during my last hard relapse in high school. Very relatable from the perspective of mental illness and being sort of a shut in.

3. The Hunchback of Notre Dame - This book was also my safe space during that relapse.

4. Anything by Flannery O'Connor. 

5.The Odyssey - I make too many jokes about Nobody for this to not be on the list.

 

Good / Ok :

-The Iliad - I'm Sorry. Too much going on for me to really get the main point. (?)

-The Crucible -  Really liked the perspective. Would probably be good in a sociology class.

 

Why / Just Bad:

-1984 - Literally just erotica with a dystopia spin. Why. Just why.

- Hamlet - I just can't. I'm sorry. I don't get why Shakespeare was so great. I'm sorry.

- Brave New World - I mean the teacher put a very Catholic spin on it so maybe the interpretation just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

-The Everlasting Man - There are so many fallacies in this book it's literally just propaganda with an intellectual twist. Would not recommend 0/10 


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#16 Alexander Hamilton

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 10:11 PM



I was also homeschooled (online classes) but my literature education was rather spotty. I took an AP lit course and a few summer courses in high school that were more like book clubs.
FWIW

Best:
1. Kafka's Metamorphosis - Story of my life right here. I refuse to accept any interpretation that does not involve mental illness. (this was actually for a college course)
2. Crime and Punishment - I read this during my last hard relapse in high school. Very relatable from the perspective of mental illness and being sort of a shut in.
3. The Hunchback of Notre Dame - This book was also my safe space during that relapse.
4. Anything by Flannery O'Connor.
5.The Odyssey - I make too many jokes about Nobody for this to not be on the list.

Good / Ok :
-The Iliad - I'm Sorry. Too much going on for me to really get the main point. (?)
-The Crucible - Really liked the perspective. Would probably be good in a sociology class.

Why / Just Bad:
-1984 - Literally just erotica with a dystopia spin. Why. Just why.
- Hamlet - I just can't. I'm sorry. I don't get why Shakespeare was so great. I'm sorry.
- Brave New World - I mean the teacher put a very Catholic spin on it so maybe the interpretation just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
-The Everlasting Man - There are so many fallacies in this book it's literally just propaganda with an intellectual twist. Would not recommend 0/10



Ok but your dislike for 1984 is offensive to me personally and I am pressing charges.

In all seriousness though 1984 is a brilliant novel (in my opinion lmao you’re entitled to dislike it) I think for the time it was written, it is far beyond it’s years and a very accurate warning about overuse and trust in government, and I believe every person should read it. Scary how much of it is becoming true.

#FirstSecretaryOfMPAState

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#WashingtonIsMyThinspiration

 

 

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#17 faeriepuke

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Posted 07 December 2020 - 12:06 PM

exclusively doing middle/high school required reading otherwise i would be here forever

 

1. the catcher in the rye - i had to take english online my sophomore year bc of depression and i was generally very angry at the world at the time. so yeah i really related to this book in the way that any angsty teen would. for the final i wrote a really half-baked essay on how i thought holden had been molested as a child and i got a 100 so i might be biased, but yeah this is #1

 

2. the crucible - actually had to read it twice bc i switched classes. as an unbearably spiteful young girl i found abigail relatable and overall thought the story was titillating, for lack of a better word. idk i think it holds up on many levels, even today

 

3. pride and prejudice - iconic in every way. what little women was to me as a child is what this book is to me now.

 

4. the great gatsby - i mean i don't even think i have to explain. not my favorite fitzgerald book but i still really enjoyed it. also my teacher made us watch the baz luhrman adaption in class and it was awful

 

5. 1984 - i actually read this in 7th grade english and i deeply question my teacher's judgement in choosing this book. i really liked it at the time but it was honestly too erotic and complicated for a bunch of 13 year olds

 

6. romeo and juliet - honestly, i like shakespeare. this one was my favorite just because it's such an iconic story and a lot of the prose is really strong

 

7. of mice and men - good read. honestly i haven't read it in 4-5 years so i don't have much to say, but i remember liking it.

 

8. hamlet - always thought that hamlet was a little bitch and also my teacher made us act out scenes for the class which was torture. #justiceforophelia

 

9. to kill a mockingbird - i like to kill a mockingbird a lot but i really can't read it without thinking about how harper lee absolutely ruined the story with go set a watchman

 

10. animal farm - fuck this book

 

11. the odyssey - i really like greek plays but i hated this (not that it's a play or anything). odysseus is incredibly unlikeable, everything that happens is just too convenient, and it's just not an enjoyable or particularly interesting read. would have rather been assigned some percy jackson or something


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#18 Skiinystars

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Posted 07 December 2020 - 01:48 PM

best: the five people you meet in heaven

worst: all quiet on the western front/the stranger


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#19 disaster_

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 01:16 AM

1. Great Gatsby- I loved this so much ahaha

2. Ariel by Sylvia Plath- We didn't study all the poems, but the ones I read were good, I liked them.

3. Tomorrow When The War Began this was ok. I liked how the main character was a girl, because usually the books we had to read all had male protagonists, so that was different (i think we read this in middle school but anyway)

3.The Passion by Jeanette Winterson - I think I was the only person in my class who didn't like this, but it was a sort of fantasy "magical realism" that I didn't really vibe with at all. I thought it was a bit pretentious tbh

4. Hamlet- It was ok I guess. I didn't read all of it, but I watched like 5 different movie versions of it so I could pass the end of year exam.

5. Romeo and Juliet- didn't read all of it. Hated the old english.. felt so dumb trying to understand it. We had to act it out in class too which was embarassing.

6. Twelfth Night- SoooOOOO much Shakespeare! Why??? I read all of this one, but could not for the life of me tell you what actually happened in it, I've blocked it from my memory.

7. The Doll House This was really boring *yawn*

 

I read the uglies series in middle school and was OBSESSED, still trying to get them from my library to this day lol

Worst for me was that one book with all the kids on the island, children of the flies? That’s prob wrong LOL but only bcuz I didn’t get it and felt stupid when my classmate explained it to me

Lord of the Flies? I read that a while ago... What actually happened in it i was so confused?


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#20 jealousofthefrogs

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 05:39 PM

1. Frankenstein, all time favourite book, the root of sci-fi, sparked my love of philosophy. It put words and answers to some of the questions about and turmoil with life I was having at the time. I try to keep a physical copy with me often

 

2. Big Maggie, written by the utter legend John B. Keane. I don't know how others might feel about it, but if you grew up frustrated with and alienated from your rural Irish upbringing you'll love it (same goes for basically any of Keane's plays)

 

3. Animal Farm, great book. Loved and hated by some for what they see as a critique of socialism as a whole, which imo is a simplistic and unfair impression. It's more a critique of certain proponents of socialism 

 

4. The Handmaid's Tail, I hated it when I read it, now I love it

 

5, Hamlet, I hated it when I read it, now think it's pretty good.

 

6, The Outsiders, meh. YA Fiction wasn't really my thing by the time I read it

 

7, The Dubliners, I actually quite liked the Dubliners, but it is the one exception, otherwise let me take this opportunity to express HOW MUCH I HATE JAMES JOYCE. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN IS INSUFFERABLE TRIPE, ULYSSES IS THE MOST PRETENTIOUS, ESOTERIC BOOK I'VE EVER READ. IT DOESN'T MAKE IT INTELLIGENT, IT MAKES IT PRACTICALLY MEANINGLESS

 

*ahem*

 

Anyway, my honourable mention goes Dr Faustus by Christopher Marlowe. I didn't have to read it, but my 1st year English teacher showed us a performance on youtube and I've been in love with it ever since, another play I keep a copy of near me where I can. This is my fav scene

 


"there are still faint glimmers of civilisation left in this barbaric slaughterhouse that was once known as humanity"



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