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it doesn’t work anymore


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#1 itsnotmel

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 12:41 PM

it doesn’t work anymore
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#2 itsnotmel

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 12:41 PM

the restriction never ever lasts. i either b/p or mainly just binge. should i give up on restriction?


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#3 juliette.

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 12:42 PM

i think the question is what does work?


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#4 itsnotmel

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 01:06 PM

i think the question is what does work?


wish i knew the answer to that


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#5 RoachGalore

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 01:13 PM

I got used to b/p so much so that I don’t even count cals anymore. Restriction is hard so what I suggest is making sure you don’t stuff yourself. But still eat a decent amount. Because restriction inevitably leads to that b/p cycle
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#6 spoiltrotten

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 01:19 PM

how low are you restricting? 


intj 4w5

 


#7 itsnotmel

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Posted 04 December 2021 - 02:38 PM

how low are you restricting?

fasting/low-medium restriction

ik its not gonna work long term but i can’t bring myself to eat more because it feels like a binge and then i’ll binge more


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#8 calorieph0bic

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 05:13 PM

There's no magical tip. One has to control itself or just purge it
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#9 calorieph0bic

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 05:13 PM

There's no magical tip. One has to control itself or just purge it

#10 calorieph0bic

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 05:14 PM

There's no magical tip I could give. You have to do which what you can stick

#11 calorieph0bic

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 05:14 PM

There's no magical tip I could give, sorry

#12 itsnotmel

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 11:47 PM

There's no magical tip. One has to control itself or just purge it



ight thanks shawty


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#13 Alina5

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 01:51 PM

There's no magical tip. One has to control itself or just purge it


what a shitty advise

#14 Alina5

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 01:51 PM

There's no magical tip. One has to control itself or just purge it


what a shitty advise

#15 Alina5

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 01:55 PM

Yes, it might be good to give up restriction. Have you tried high restriction? You could try sticking to a "normie" dietplan that allows you to lose very slow but efficient, or change your fitness routine, try to cut out certain foods, try low carb, try whatever you must but please don't start purging omg I hate it when people are like that.

#16 itsnotmel

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 02:21 PM

Yes, it might be good to give up restriction. Have you tried high restriction? You could try sticking to a "normie" dietplan that allows you to lose very slow but efficient, or change your fitness routine, try to cut out certain foods, try low carb, try whatever you must but please don't start purging omg I hate it when people are like that.

they say it like i haven’t tried purging bro i literally said i b/p too like i literally do purge sometimes aswell like come on.
(control yourself) yeah alright i’ll just lose the ed


thank you for your advice :) yes i’ve tried all of it but the thing is that i can never MENTALLY stop restricting. my mind is always like “we have to restrict more, let’s just eat whatever and start fresh tomorrow, if you eat normally you’re gonna gain weight so whats the point?, give up, don’t even try..etc.) so idk what to do anymore


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#17 AnxiousBunny

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 03:54 PM

Restriction leads to binges. I know that you probably already know this and that it’s hard to break the cycle but I really want you to try eating more. Sending you infinite love and support.
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#18 Avyeon

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 08:09 PM

Ive found eating varied and having proper fiber / protein really helps personally.
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#19 θαυματοποιός

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 10:28 PM

Restriction leads to binges. I know that you probably already know this and that it’s hard to break the cycle but I really want you to try eating more. Sending you infinite love and support.

I second this. 

 

To add to the other comments - loading up on fiber, protein, and even fats will help you feel more full. 

As someone who just got out of binge eating two months ago - it's a slow process. My method may not help you, but I'll break it down and hopefully some aspects of it will help benefit you as well.  I did it in steps, so I'll just do that format since it helped me. 

Step 1: Identify the time you binge, emotions you are feeling throughout the day (yes day, not right before), and specific foods that make you more likely to binge. Like for me, pasta is a major one. I figured out if I eat pasta for lunch or dinner, my binges were bigger and more often than say, a sandwich. Track your mood during the day for a week, what you're eating each day (just the food at first, not the calories), and look for patterns on the days you binge/how large the binge was and when the binge(s) happened.

Step 2: For me, I had timeframes, stress, etc. Since I now knew the times I was likely to binge, the emotions, etc. I was able to recognize it. At that point, reminding myself started playing a role. I had times where I would go into the kitchen and it would me suddenly - a thought something like "wait, am I hungry or am I feeling ____? I know I ate ____, this is a craving. This isn't real hunger, I don't need to eat." Even just telling yourself "no, this is a craving, I'm okay without it, I ate this and it was delicious, it was good, when I finished ____ I felt good and satisfied." After that started happening throughout week two, it was getting easier to stop the binges, but every now and then I still would.  

 

Step 3: For timeline purposes, at this point I was about 2.5-3 weeks in. Affirmations can into play, and not like the terrible ones you see for self-love or whatever. It was stuff along the lines of "I am satisfied, I am not hungry, I am feeling ___ and this has nothing to do with food." etc. Once I was able to step away moving into the middle of the 3rd week, it became more of keeping myself busy. Writing, school work (college student here), painting, etc whatever you like to do. I started making mental replacements for foods I was craving. Savory? Egg drop soup. Sweet? Kickstart. The list goes on, you'll find your own. 

 

Step 4: Age old advice that works, don't cut out foods you love. I mentioned pasta, so I'll continue the use for that one. I also had a thing for pizza, so I'll do that too. I started focusing on nutrients around weeks 4.5-5.5, and decided to start using edamame pasta. Added some pesto, it's actually really good. Edamame pasta is very high in protein and has a good deal of fiber too, so I was full for hours after eating it. I could eat 450cal of the pasta, and I would feel full. Pizza? Two low-carb/low-cal tortillas, pizza sauce, sprinkle cheese. Filling due to the fibers and fats, using previous steps, at this point I was about 2 weeks without a binge. The cravings were finally starting to fade away at this point too, and I was starting to get to productive levels that I'm at now. I'll throw it in here - one of the things I do now when I do get a minor craving to binge is drink water or tea. Water also helps with digestion, which means you're meeting more nutrient goals which has been proven to reduce over eating and cravings.  

 

Step 5: Moving into month 2, I was able to start restricting and counting calories again. I was maintaining my weight while getting out of the binge behaviors, and my emotional connection to food was also pretty much gone. I still enjoyed food, but I was no longer feeling mentally hungry or anything (emotional hunger.) One day, I counted my calories. 2,200ish calories in a day. Significantly better than nearly 4-5k when I would binge. So I decided to start at 2k cals, did it for a week, had a binge. Afterward I recognized what caused it, but didn't let myself fall back into it. I tried 2k again, I was fine. So I did it for a week, then I dropped to 1600cal. I was fine once again, so I dropped to 1500, then 1400, and then 1200. I was fine, I had some cravings, but not many. Now I'm able to sit at 800-1000 cal a day, while being active. 

 

Other things to note: 
1. Stop demonizing a binge, don't think of it as failure, instead as a slip-up and it was just a mistake. No harm done, it happens. Remind yourself of the first steps, remember how much better it feels to not binge, and start again the next day. 

2. Tea. Tea. Tea. Love this stuff now, and throwing in some vanilla oat milk with a dessert tea? Life changing. 
3. If you eat at a computer or doing something, have a drink or a soup with you instead. Use that to keep your mouth busy instead of food.  
4. My timeline won't be your timeline. It's easy to feel almost black and white about binge eating, but it does you absolutely no good. Instead, focus on the smaller victories. It took me about 3 months, but it could take you a month, or 4 months. The goal is the stop the binge eating - everything else will follow. Don't set dates, don't set timeframes. Move to each next step when you're ready. 

5. Water, water, water.  Start an affair with water. As a rule of thumb, try to drink 2 liters a day, work up to about 3-4liters. 
6. Make sure you're well-rested, multiple studies have shown that if you don't get enough sleep, you tend to eat more to supplement the energy lost from exhaustion. 

 

 

Best of luck <3 


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#20 itsnotmel

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 10:55 PM

I second this.

To add to the other comments - loading up on fiber, protein, and even fats will help you feel more full.

As someone who just got out of binge eating two months ago - it's a slow process. My method may not help you, but I'll break it down and hopefully some aspects of it will help benefit you as well. I did it in steps, so I'll just do that format since it helped me.

Step 1: Identify the time you binge, emotions you are feeling throughout the day (yes day, not right before), and specific foods that make you more likely to binge. Like for me, pasta is a major one. I figured out if I eat pasta for lunch or dinner, my binges were bigger and more often than say, a sandwich. Track your mood during the day for a week, what you're eating each day (just the food at first, not the calories), and look for patterns on the days you binge/how large the binge was and when the binge(s) happened.

Step 2: For me, I had timeframes, stress, etc. Since I now knew the times I was likely to binge, the emotions, etc. I was able to recognize it. At that point, reminding myself started playing a role. I had times where I would go into the kitchen and it would me suddenly - a thought something like "wait, am I hungry or am I feeling ____? I know I ate ____, this is a craving. This isn't real hunger, I don't need to eat." Even just telling yourself "no, this is a craving, I'm okay without it, I ate this and it was delicious, it was good, when I finished ____ I felt good and satisfied." After that started happening throughout week two, it was getting easier to stop the binges, but every now and then I still would.

Step 3: For timeline purposes, at this point I was about 2.5-3 weeks in. Affirmations can into play, and not like the terrible ones you see for self-love or whatever. It was stuff along the lines of "I am satisfied, I am not hungry, I am feeling ___ and this has nothing to do with food." etc. Once I was able to step away moving into the middle of the 3rd week, it became more of keeping myself busy. Writing, school work (college student here), painting, etc whatever you like to do. I started making mental replacements for foods I was craving. Savory? Egg drop soup. Sweet? Kickstart. The list goes on, you'll find your own.

Step 4: Age old advice that works, don't cut out foods you love. I mentioned pasta, so I'll continue the use for that one. I also had a thing for pizza, so I'll do that too. I started focusing on nutrients around weeks 4.5-5.5, and decided to start using edamame pasta. Added some pesto, it's actually really good. Edamame pasta is very high in protein and has a good deal of fiber too, so I was full for hours after eating it. I could eat 450cal of the pasta, and I would feel full. Pizza? Two low-carb/low-cal tortillas, pizza sauce, sprinkle cheese. Filling due to the fibers and fats, using previous steps, at this point I was about 2 weeks without a binge. The cravings were finally starting to fade away at this point too, and I was starting to get to productive levels that I'm at now. I'll throw it in here - one of the things I do now when I do get a minor craving to binge is drink water or tea. Water also helps with digestion, which means you're meeting more nutrient goals which has been proven to reduce over eating and cravings.

Step 5: Moving into month 2, I was able to start restricting and counting calories again. I was maintaining my weight while getting out of the binge behaviors, and my emotional connection to food was also pretty much gone. I still enjoyed food, but I was no longer feeling mentally hungry or anything (emotional hunger.) One day, I counted my calories. 2,200ish calories in a day. Significantly better than nearly 4-5k when I would binge. So I decided to start at 2k cals, did it for a week, had a binge. Afterward I recognized what caused it, but didn't let myself fall back into it. I tried 2k again, I was fine. So I did it for a week, then I dropped to 1600cal. I was fine once again, so I dropped to 1500, then 1400, and then 1200. I was fine, I had some cravings, but not many. Now I'm able to sit at 800-1000 cal a day, while being active.

Other things to note:
1. Stop demonizing a binge, don't think of it as failure, instead as a slip-up and it was just a mistake. No harm done, it happens. Remind yourself of the first steps, remember how much better it feels to not binge, and start again the next day.
2. Tea. Tea. Tea. Love this stuff now, and throwing in some vanilla oat milk with a dessert tea? Life changing.
3. If you eat at a computer or doing something, have a drink or a soup with you instead. Use that to keep your mouth busy instead of food.
4. My timeline won't be your timeline. It's easy to feel almost black and white about binge eating, but it does you absolutely no good. Instead, focus on the smaller victories. It took me about 3 months, but it could take you a month, or 4 months. The goal is the stop the binge eating - everything else will follow. Don't set dates, don't set timeframes. Move to each next step when you're ready.
5. Water, water, water. Start an affair with water. As a rule of thumb, try to drink 2 liters a day, work up to about 3-4liters.
6. Make sure you're well-rested, multiple studies have shown that if you don't get enough sleep, you tend to eat more to supplement the energy lost from exhaustion.


Best of luck <3




thank you so much for taking the time to type this, i really appreciate it !! <3
love this, great tips

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